Marine Biology Findings from University of California San Diego (UCSD) Reported: “Using Local Ecological Knowledge of Fishers To Infer the Impact of Climate Variability In Galapagos’ Small-scale Fisheries”

Marine Biology Findings from University of California San Diego (UCSD) Reported: “Using Local Ecological Knowledge of Fishers To Infer the Impact of Climate Variability In Galapagos’ Small-scale Fisheries

29 January 2021
Ecology, Environment & Conservation
© Copyright 2021 Ecology, Environment & Conservation via VerticalNews.com

2021 FEB 5 (VerticalNews) — By a News Reporter-Staff News Editor at Ecology, Environment & Conservation —

Investigators publish new report on Biology – Marine Biology. According to news reporting from La Jolla, California, by VerticalNews journalists, research stated,

“Galapagos has been characterized by a great abundance of marine life and high levels of endemism. Due to its geographical position, this archipelago experiences tremendous climate variability during El Nino events, which disturb the entire marine food web, and ultimately affect the artisanal fishing activity.”

Financial support for this research came from Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Cientifico e Tecnologico.

The news correspondents obtained a quote from the research from the University of California San Diego (UCSD), “In this study, we explored the main impacts of El Nino events on artisanal fishing and marine life using the local ecological knowledge provided by four generations of fishers on the most populated islands in the Galapagos.

Anecdotal information and perceptions coincided with the current scientific literature and provided novel insights about: (i) the positive and negative effects of the El Nino years on artisanal fisheries and marine animals, (ii) differences in species caught during warm and cold seasons and (iii) current interactions among artisanal fisheries, tourism and unauthorized industrial fisheries activities within the 40 nautical miles that surround the Galapagos Marine Reserve. In addition, fishers provided valuable information for governing resources under anomalously warm years, by identifying sites that function as natural refuges for fish and invertebrates during El Nino events.

Data derived from these interviews highlight an urgent need for a novel, bottom-up and collaborative fisheries governance, between the artisanal fishing sector and decision and policy makers in Galapagos.”

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “Collaborative initiatives, involving one of the sectors that first inhabited the archipelago, is essential to achieve sustainable and long-term use of marine resources and to increase and anticipate human and environmental resilience under continued long-term global warming.”

This research has been peer-reviewed. For more information on this research see: Using Local Ecological Knowledge of Fishers To Infer the Impact of Climate Variability In Galapagos’ Small-scale Fisheries. Marine Policy, 2020;121:104195. Marine Policy can be contacted at: Elsevier, The Boulevard, Langford Lane, Kidlington, Oxford OX5 1GB, Oxon, England. (Elsevier – www.elsevier.com; Marine Policy – www.journals.elsevier.com/marine-policy/)

Our news journalists report that additional information may be obtained by contacting Leticia Maria Cavole, University of California San Diego (UCSD), Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92093, United States. Additional authors for this research include Daniela Faggiani Dias, Octavio Aburto-Oropeza, Solange Andrade-Vera, Jose R. Marin Jarrin and Maria Jose Barragan-Paladines.

Our reports deliver fact-based news of research and discoveries from around the world. Copyright 2021, NewsRx LLC

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