Petrel nesting season ended in Floreana, Galapagos; 141 new birds were registered

Petrel nesting season ended in Floreana, Galapagos; 141 new birds were registered

October 20, 2020 – 4:22 pm

The Galapagos National Park Directorate (GNPD) reported that this week the nesting period of Galapagos petrels in Floreana ended, in the only colony on the island, located in Cerro Pajas, with a total of 141 new birds, which were integrated into the population dynamics of the species.

85% of this season’s chicks were ringed before they flew from their nests. The identification ring placed on one of its legs will allow rangers to recognize the bird when they return to nest in the next few years.

GNPD personnel carry out controls for invasive species that affect nesting sites, such as introduced blackberry and guava plants; as well as rodents and ants that threaten to favor the access of the birds to the nests, as well as the safety of the youngsters until they are ready to fly.

Although the nesting season begins in late January with the arrival of the first pairs and ends in October when the last chicks leave the nest, the rangers monitor these areas throughout the year, including the months of inactivity for part of the petrels.

This is the only endemic Galapagos seabird that nests in the upper parts of the Santa Cruz, San Cristóbal, Santiago, Floreana and Isabela islands, over 500 meters high.

The Galapagos petrel chooses humid soils with vegetation or rocks, where it opens nests to lay a single egg each year, in the same colony in which they were incubated and raised by their parents. (I)

https://www.eluniverso.com/noticias/2020/10/20/nota/8021023/finalizo-temporada-anidacion-petreles-floreana-galapagos-se


Informing and sharing news on marine life, flora, fauna and conservation in the Galápagos Islands since 2017
© SOS Galápagos, 2021

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